The Disappearing Terrace And Courtyard as Feminine Spaces in Algeria

Restructuring of family and gender relations has greatly affected the private and public space in Algeria. Today, cities are subject to modern vs traditional duality. The traditional houses of the medinas, which constitute an important part of the urban habitat, are juxtaposed with the slums and contemporary dwellings of peripheral districts (the new suburbs). Public spaces have evolved from hierarchical and functional old fabrics of … Continue reading The Disappearing Terrace And Courtyard as Feminine Spaces in Algeria

#NtaRajel: le paradoxe de la destruction du patriarcat

Cet article s’adresse à une audience musulmane maghrébine. Le mouvement NtaRajel aurait pu être celui qui nous aurait permis d’épurer le système patriarcal au Maghreb, et renforcer ses mérites en corrigeant les défaillances des hommes au niveau de leur responsabilité et devoirs. Au lieu de cela, ce mouvement est devenu une banale extension du féminisme dans le contexte maghrébin, et reprend le récit et la … Continue reading #NtaRajel: le paradoxe de la destruction du patriarcat

The #NtaRajel Movement: The Fog Between The Villain And Virility

Why take part in the #NtaRajel movement if it does not conform to Islam? This article is addressed to a Maghrebi Muslim audience “Nta Rajel?” scraped American Twitter as only a meme, but French Twitter derived from it a movement whose official aim is to combat the machismo and misogyny of Maghrebi men but unofficially it is a feminist and/or misandrist movement which considers the … Continue reading The #NtaRajel Movement: The Fog Between The Villain And Virility

Debunking a Myth: Etymology Behind the Word “Berber”

Berber in its original usage ≠ “uncivilized barbarian” We are told religiously that the word “Berber” comes from the word “barbaric”. Originally, the term barbaric, borrowed in French (barbare) in 1308 from the Latin barbarus, itself from the ancient Greek βάρβαρος: bárbaros (“foreigner”), was used by the ancient Greeks to designate peoples not belonging to their civilization (defined by the Hellenic language and religion). Bárbaros … Continue reading Debunking a Myth: Etymology Behind the Word “Berber”

The Ills of Post-Colonial Neo-Berberism

The birth of neo-Berberism has tilted genuine social, cultural, and economic causes into a territorial and ideological matrix that not only harms the Berber image but the collective populace. Those who become prey to the propaganda internalize stereotypes and project an offensive vision. Author’s Note “Neo–” as a prefix to Berberism suggests a faux revival of Berberism. That is, a Berberism that relies on a … Continue reading The Ills of Post-Colonial Neo-Berberism

Arabization of Chaouis

When it comes to Berbers of Northern Algeria, Kabyles seem to get the spotlight, for better or for worse. Chaouis, however, tend to fade into the background. It’s a curious phenomenon that cannot go without some dissection. There is a sociolinguistic situation that plays out with the Chaoui variety of Berber, a victim of a diglossic type of conflict that, under the weight of Arabization, … Continue reading Arabization of Chaouis

Arabization of the Kabyle Language

The infamous legacy of colonialism aside, the real threat to preserving the authenticity of Northern Berber languages began with the autonomous nation-state that created an intensive Arabization enterprise. How it was conducted and persisted shows us an evolution of speech which of course is not all the same across la Kabylie, let alone other Berber regions. Most know about certain Darja loan words that are … Continue reading Arabization of the Kabyle Language